KAMALA HARRIS – “HOPEFUL 1ST Minority Woman – U.S. VP”

Minority Women bring new flavors to u.s. politics

Brooklyn’s own Shirley Chisholm joined the NY State Assembly in 1965. During that time, the Voting Rights Act gave way to the 15th Amendment which prohibited voter discrimination based on gender. Chisholm excited a band of black women voters and held fast to the slogan, “Unbought—unbossed”. By 1968, Shirley Chisholm was the 1st black woman to win a seat in Congress, and four years later, she ran for President! One of the 1st women, also women of color, to pave the road for “minority women in politics” to enter on their own terms. Today, we see Kamala Harris carrying the torch and echoing the scent one of Shirley Chisholm’s memorable quotes: “I am not the candidate of the women’s movement, of this country, although I am a woman and I’m equally proud of that…I am the candidate of the people of America. And my presence before you now symbolize a new era in American political history”. Additionally, Black Enterprise Magazine headlines black women as “A New Force in Politics” … “Game changers and Shot Callers”. Cheerleading women into the arena of politics, accompanying Kamala Harris’ Vice President nomination, are at minimum, 130 black, or multi-racial women looking forward to seating in The US House and Senate, during this November’s election.

The hopeful appointments and placements of female, minority, political and judicial influencers are merely the beginning of our journey towards the complex facets of gender equality with American society. Just as there were numerous milestones to be accomplished throughout the “women’s suffrage” age, we have gleaned that the mere appointment and/or placement of a minority female, within government, is only a large step towards an uphill incline. We are elated that Kamala Harris is the running mate for this year’s presidential campaign. Harmoniously, we can imagine her voice affecting many changes, should she indeed win the election as the 1st Multi-racial Female Vice-President of the United States. Realistically, history also reminds us that,

during the same year that Shirley Chisholm won the 1st seat as a black woman in Congress during November of 1968, on April 4th Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated. More than 50 years later, in 2020, the “Black Lives Matter” campaign—the plight for racial equity with fairness is well and alive. Kamala Harris has shared her views.

World Economic Forum places active gender equality well into the 23rd Century

Much like weight gain due to emotional eating, the emotion must find its place within the healing process, and the recovery methods must visit truth, acknowledgment and discipline in order to rid the effects of overeating. Systemic racism should unmask its perceptions, admit its undue damages and awaken to embrace its need for correction. This does not take place overnight. Realistically, since its implementation is at about 400 years. The uphill climb commenced in the sixties, as it gains momentum, the 23rd century projection made by The World Forum looks like a mirrored/balanced scale, with 400 years on each of its sides. Kamala Harris, with her stance being against the death penalty, according to the Times, she refused a San Francisco’s district attorney opportunity to seek execution of a man who had killed a police officer. Kamala also supported what the Times described as “a modest expansion of her office’s powers to investigate police misconduct.” Those entities who are unwilling to subscribe to accountability and appropriate reform are not looking forward to the possibilities offered by the coloring this November’s presidential elections. However, Noire is here and making waves for change.

1 Comment

  1. “I am not the candidate of the women’s movement, of this country, although I am a woman and I’m equally proud of that…I am the candidate of the people of America. And my presence before you now symbolize a new era in American political history”. I think Kamala Harris’ distinct clarifying words were/are of key importance. And I love the connection and distinctions you draw with Kamala and Shirley Chisholm.

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